JEROME

NAME: Jerome
COUNTY: Yavapai
ROADS: 2WD Paved
LEGAL INFO: T16N, R2E
CLIMATE: Mild winter, mild summer
BEST TIME TO VISIT: Anytime
COMMENTS: Most of the town is original. The original hotel has been reopened and is worth staying at. Most buildings are occupied. Great article on Jerome.
REMAINS: Most everything is still there.

Jerome's post office was established September 10, 1883 and has never been discontinued. Once the fifth largest city in Arizona, Jerome has now been reduced to a ghost of a city. Copper was the mainstay and the mines are rumored to have started over 1000 years ago by the Tuzigoot Indians. In 1882, the United Verde Copper company was formed by James A. McDonald and Eugene Jerome of New York, and Governor Tritle of Arizona. Copper demands increased and so did mining in Jerome. At one time, Jerome have over 15,000 residents inhabiting its streets. The depression years marked the end of prosperous times for Jerome and the mines finally closed in 1950. Then, some residents founded the Jerome Historical Society and proclaimed Jerome to be America's newest and largest ghost city. This is probably what saved the town from total extinction. Today, small shops line the street along with ruins of its past such as the famous traveling jail. Jerome is a well spent trip and is highly recommended. - GT

Jerome Arizona: I know I've sent another article about Jerome, but  Ghost City on Mingus Mountain, April 1956,  Page 11, in Desert Magazine, has some great photos of some remaining denizens of the town. Written by Grover Brinkman.

Jerome is located in Yavapai County, on the slopes of Cleopatra Hill. Post office opened on September 10, 1883 and is still in use. Once in time Jerome was fifth biggest town in Arizona, but now is reduced to capitol of the ghost towns. Main income was cobber and the mining in the area started for 1000 years ago, by the Tuzigoot Indians. In 1882, United Ver-de Copper Com-pany was grounded by James A. McDonald, Eugene Jerome from New York and Governor Tritle of Arizona. Finely, the cobber was mined out and mining in Jerome died. In the heydays over 15.000 people lived in Jerome. The depression years marked end of progress in Jerome and the mines closed finely in 1950. After that some citizens grounded Jerome Historical Society and proclaimed Jerome as Americas newest and biggest ghost town. That was the reason why Jerome was sawed from total collapse and destruction. To day you will se many stores along the main street between ruins from the past, as old jail. The most of the town is saved in the original condition and the mostly houses are habitat. You will find almost everything in Jerome and the trip to the town is recommended. Bobby Zlatevski


Jerome
Courtesy Tom McCurnin


Jerome
Courtesy Tom McCurnin


Copper Mine
Courtesy Dolores Steele


Jerome Cemetery
Courtesy Dolores Steele


Jerome Cemetery
Courtesy Dolores Steele

Jerome Cemetery
Courtesy Dolores Steele

On the hill stands the Little Daisy Hotel - constructed 1919 by mining company
as a hotel for their employees - 44 rooms.
Courtesy Dolores Steele


Ruins just above Jerome
Todd Underwood


Jerome
Courtesy Bobby Krause Zlatevski


Jerome
Courtesy Bobby Krause Zlatevski


Jerome
Courtesy Bobby Krause Zlatevski


Jerome
Courtesy Bobby Krause Zlatevski


Building that says " Ghost Town"
Courtesy Scott Irvine


Jerome Main Street 1911
Courtesy Arizona Historical Society

Jerome 1913
Courtesy Arizona Historical Society


Jerome
Copyright: The Aurora Gallery/Wes Shrader Photography


Jerome
Courtesy Dolores Steele


Jerome
Courtesy Dolores Steele


Jerome
Courtesy Dolores Steele


Jail
Courtesy Dolores Steele


Jerome
Courtesy Dolores Steele


Jerome
Courtesy Dolores Steele


Ruins just above Jerome
Todd Underwood


Jerome
Courtesy Bobby Krause Zlatevski


Jerome
Courtesy Bobby Krause Zlatevski


Jerome
Courtesy Bobby Krause Zlatevski


Jerome
Courtesy Bobby Krause Zlatevski


Jerome
From the Johnnie Walker Collection
Courtesy Charlie Osborn


Jerome
From the Johnnie Walker Collection
Courtesy Charlie Osborn


Ghost City Inn
Courtesy Scott Irvine

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