SILVER PALM

NAME: Silver Palm
COUNTY: Miami-Dade
ROADS: 2WD
GRID: 4
CLIMATE: hot summer, otherwise warm
BEST TIME TO VISIT: anytime
COMMENTS: The Silver Palm area is near the corner of 232nd Street and SW 157th Avenue, between US1 and SR997 (Krome Ave)
REMAINS: Anderson's Corner general store, Silver Palm schoolhouse (now a residence), Historic Marker, old homes
In the early 1900's, the town of Silver Palm developed near the intersection of Silver Palm Drive and Newton Road. It went from a small number of homesteading farmers to span the area from Perrine (near present day US1) to Florida City. The name came from the silver palm trees that grew in the area. Early settlers included Charles Gossman and William Anderson, who built the first general store in town. From 1910 to 1920 Dade County's population quadrupled in size. As more and more homesteaders found their way south, the lowlands were drained, allowing the citrus industry to begin and thrive in the tropical climate. A schoolhouse was built just across the road from Anderson's General Store, making the area known as "Anderson's Corner". The citrus canker epidemic in 1913 devastated the area economy. Farmers watched helplessly as government inspection teams burned their orange groves. The 1926 Hurricane dealt another blow to the area, followed soonafter by the Great Depression. William Anderson closed his store in 1930, and today Anderson's Store, the Silver Palm School, and a few scattered old houses are all that remain. Today, only two original structures survive: the Silver Palm School and the community general store. Submitted by: Jim Pike

Anderson's general store, Silver Palm
Courtesy Jim Pike


Silver Palm Schoolhouse, now a private residence
Courtesy Jim Pike


Silver Palm Historic Marker
Courtesy Jim Pike


Burning orange groves during citrus canker epidemic, 1913. 
Photo courtesy of South Florida Historic Society


A Bald Eagle sits in a dead pine tree, Silver Palm 1916. 
Photo courtesy of Florida Archives


Anderson's General Store at Silver Palm, 1911 or 1912, courtesy of the Historical Museum of South Florida

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