BELLEHELEN

NAME: Bellehelen
COUNTY: Nye
ROADS: 2WD
GRID: 8
CLIMATE: Warm to hot summer, cool to cold winter days with occasional snow.
BEST TIME TO VISIT:
Anytime except during periods of heavy snow.
COMMENTS:Bladed dirt roads.
REMAINS: Several stone walls.

Bellehelen came to the front in 1904, an outgrowth of the Tonopah/Goldfield boom. Miners swarmed over every mountain range in all directions from the centers of commerce. Bellehelen was founded in a canyon in the Kawich Range, while nearby Golden Arrow and Silverbow also flourished nearby. A post office was opened April 27, 1907, however it was rescinded January 19, 1908. However mining continued on a scale big enough to warrant reopening the post office October 15, 1909. George Wingfield's engineers checked out Bellehelen in 1907, but left empty handed. The camp's better years were 1909 through the next year, when about 500 people made Bellehelen their home. After 1911, the district remained quiet, until 1917, when the Pacific States Mining Company began operations on a large scale. In 1922, the company merged with the Tonopah-Kawich Company, which produced a large mill, but ultimately proved unsuccessful. The mill ceased operations in 1927. Since then, Bellehelen has been ghosted and only faint traces of it remain today in a picturesque setting amid the piņons and junipers of the Kawich Range. Bellehelen, NV also had a newspaper. It was published as the Bellehelen Record. It was published for a short run beginning April 1907, and died before the end of the year. Submitted by David A. Wright, Great Basin Research.

The west flank of the Kawich range was the site of gold and silver ore discoveries in early 1904. In September of 1906 a townsite called Henry was platted. Businesses included an eating house, a store, and a saloon. By 1907, the Bellehelen Mining Company had been formed and was working the Henry mines. A post office opened in April 1907 with the name Bellehelen. By March 1908 there were six active mining companies in Bellehelen. Activity began to decline in late 1910 and by the beginning of 1911 the town had only fifty residents and the district fell silent soon afterwards. The district ended its slumber in 1917 when several mining companies merged and began operations that lasted until 1924. There were other mining companies that worked the property until 1934 when Bellehelen emptied for good. Absolutely nothing remains of the camp.



Bellehelen, Nevada. April 14, 1999.
Courtesy David A. Wright


Bellehelen, Nevada. April 14, 1999.
Courtesy David A. Wright


Bellehelen, Nevada. April 14, 1999.
Courtesy David A. Wright

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