DELAMAR

NAME: Delamar
COUNTY: Lincoln
ROADS: 4WD
GRID: 8
CLIMATE: Hot in summer, snow in winter, in Delamar Mountains
BEST TIME TO VISIT:
Spring, late summer
COMMENTS: Rather exstensive ruins and a few facades of buildings on the main street.It's quite a long ride to the site as it is about 35 miles from the Crystal Springs cutoff on rather changable roads and through a few dry washes.This is Four wheel drive travel only after you exit the Extraterrestrial Highway.
Delamar is off US 93 approx. 16 miles west of Caliente, NV. Drive about 15 miles south on a gravel/rock road to Delamar. Sign is posted on gravel road. Four wheel drive vehicle is likely required. Great article on Delamar.
REMAINS: Worth the drive and lots of expolration opportunities ......but please use your camera and not your shovels and picks on the remains. Several buildings, cemetery, farm implements, etc...

Big siver strike around late 1890's..........boom lasted trough about early 1920's.....various sporadic mining thereafter but townsite is deserted and quite a few remains as it's hard to reach destination has preserved it longer than normal. Submitted by: Rick Perry

The gold rush was on in the Pahranagat Valley of Nevada when farmers in 1890 and 1891 discovered gold in the hills around the mountainous valley. In 1892, the Ferguson Mining District was formed. Reports came into Pioche that assays of $75 to $1000 a ton of ore was being mined resulting in the first rush of miners stampeding to the district.
     While miners temporarily camped in Golden City and the town of Helene, the town of Delamar soon developed shortly thereafter when Capt. John DeLamar of Montana purchased the principal claims in 1893 for $150,000 and established the early settlement of the town.
     The first post office was opened in June 1894 and by the end of 1895, the camp had become a full-fledged town containing many businesses and more than 300 dwellings. By 1897, Delamar was home to more than 3,000 residents and supported numerous stores, saloons, a theater and other establishments.
The extensive mining operation led to the town's reputation as the "Maker of Widows" as the "Delamar Dust" or silica dust inhaled by the miners led to many deaths. Two years after 1900 when a fire destroyed half the town, Capt. DeLamar sold his interest in the mines which had produced an estimated $8.5 million in gold. The new owners, under the control of a Simon
Bamberger, continued to outproduce all other mines in the state until 1909 but the operation was closed soon after. The site was reopened briefly from 1929-34 and evidence of a mining operation continues there today. Nestled in the Delamar Mountain range are partially standing rock buildings, mill ruins and a cemetery, which some relatives apparently still visit.

Submitted by: Debra A. Estock

It was in the early 1890s when a wealthy Frenchman, Captain Joseph Rafael De La Mar began development of the rich mining camp in the Delamar hills. The town boomed from 1895 into the twentieth century, finally becoming a ghost town at the beginning of World War II, nearly a half century later. Delamar was known to many as the “widowmaker.” Several dozen women were widowed her. Because water was scarce, the crusher was run almost dry and created a fine dust that contained silica. The deadly dust was inhaled by the men, causing silicosis and an ultimately death. The dreaded dust also pierced lungs of women, children and animals. Water had to be hauled to all houses except one where it was tapped. In this house lived the “last rose of Delamar.” Agnes Horn, who had been there since childhood. Her husband was one of the young men felled by the dust. She was one of the camp's first settlers and among the last to leave. She was buried in the cemetery, beneath a rose bush that had once bloomed at her window. Submitted by Henry Chenoweth.

 


Delamar
Courtesy Debbie Estock


Delamar
Courtesy Debbie Estock


Delamar
Courtesy Debbie Estock


Delamar
Courtesy Debbie Estock


Delamar
Courtesy Debbie Estock


Delamar, Nevada. April 13, 1999.
Courtesy David A. Wright


Delamar, Nevada. April 13, 1999.
Courtesy David A. Wright


Delamar, Nevada. April 13, 1999.
Courtesy David A. Wright


Delamar, Nevada. April 13, 1999.
Courtesy David A. Wright


Delamar, Nevada. April 13, 1999.
Courtesy David A. Wright


Delamar, Nevada. April 13, 1999.
Courtesy David A. Wright


David A. Wright standing in archway of Delamar ruin. April 13, 1999. Alan H. Patera photo.
Courtesy David A. Wright


Delamar, Nevada. April 13, 1999.
Courtesy David A. Wright


Delamar, Nevada. April 13, 1999.
Courtesy David A. Wright


Delamar, Nevada. April 13, 1999.
Courtesy David A. Wright


Delamar, Nevada. April 13, 1999.
Courtesy David A. Wright


Delamar
Courtesy Donna Lee Martin


Delamar
Courtesy Donna Lee Martin


Delamar
Courtesy Donna Lee Martin


Delamar
Courtesy Debbie Estock


Delamar
Courtesy Debbie Estock


Delamar
Courtesy Debbie Estock


Delamar
Courtesy Debbie Estock


Delamar
Courtesy Debbie Estock


Delamar
Courtesy Debbie Estock


Delamar
Courtesy Debbie Estock


Delamar
Courtesy Debbie Estock


Delamar
Courtesy Debbie Estock


Delamar, Nevada. April 13, 1999.
Courtesy David A. Wright


Delamar, Nevada. April 13, 1999.
Courtesy David A. Wright


Dust still flies off the huge tailings pile. This same dust once killed many miners by silicosis, clogging up miner's lungs and caused their premature deaths. On this gusty spring day in 1999, the dust could be felt in my lungs (I have mild emphysema) and made my teeth gritty. April 13, 1999.
Courtesy David A. Wright


Delamar, Nevada. April 13, 1999.
Courtesy David A. Wright


Delamar, Nevada. April 13, 1999.
Courtesy David A. Wright


Delamar, Nevada. April 13, 1999.
Courtesy David A. Wright


Delamar Cemetery. Unmarked grave. April 13, 1999.
Courtesy David A. Wright


Delamar Cemetery. Grave of Robert Corkish, born October 12, 1871; died November 21, 1915. Photo taken April 13, 1999.
Courtesy David A. Wright


Delamar Cemetery. Grave of Etta E. Frank, 1873 to 1896. Photo taken April 13, 1999.
Courtesy David A. Wright


Delamar Cemetery. Unmarked grave. April 13, 1999.
Courtesy David A. Wright


Delamar Cemetery. Grave of Fred A. Horn. Inscription on pillar reads: "In Loving Memory of Fred A. Horn. Son of Agnes and ..." (marble pecked away) ... "August 3, 1893 to March 25th, 1912. Dearest Fred, thou hast left us here, thy lost we deeply feel, But tis God that hath bereft, he can all our sorrows heal." Photo taken April 13, 1999. Courtesy David A. Wright


Delamar Cemetery. Grave of Richard Gordon. Born March 8, 1857. Died November 2, 1907. Photo taken April 13, 1999.
Courtesy David A. Wright


Delamar
Courtesy Donna Lee Martin


Delamar
Courtesy Donna Lee Martin


Delamar
Courtesy Donna Lee Martin


Delamar
Courtesy Donna Lee Martin

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