HAMILTON

NAME: Hamilton
COUNTY: White Pine
ROADS: 2WD
GRID: 6
CLIMATE: Mild Winter, hot summer.
BEST TIME TO VISIT:
Summer.
COMMENTS: Near Ely.
REMAINS: A few buildings.

The beginning of Hamilton in 1868 started a boomtown that resulted in 25,000 people of all types migrating to the area where silver ore was for the taking. Or so it was thought. That it was partially correct lasted until 1887 when big-scale production ceased. All the silver was on top and none below. At 8,000 feet elevation, people weren't about to stay to see if a real vein could be located. People moved out almost at the same rate as they moved in, in 1868. By then there had been shipped a total of $22,000,000 in silver bullion. Hamilton is off of highway 50 between Eureka and Ely. Submitted by Henry Chenoweth.

Treasure Hill was the site of discoveries in late 1867. The area was not suitable for a townsite, so one was located at the base of Treasure Hill in May of 1868. The town was given its name after a W. H. Hamilton, one of the three that laid out the townsite. By June, the town had a population of 30 and one business establishment—a saloon. Rich discoveries on Treasure Hill created a boom and a huge rush to Hamilton took place. By winter, Hamilton’s population had swelled to 600. Once the spring thaw was over, the town had a floating population of over 10,000. Stage lines were running to Hamilton on a regular basis by summer. When White Pine County was organized in March of 1869, Hamilton was selected as the county seat. By summer, Hamilton boasted a population of 12,000. There were close to 100 saloons, several breweries, 60 general stores, and many other businesses. The town also had theaters, dance halls, skating rinks, a Miners’ Union Hall, and a fraternal order. During the peak of the White Pine rush, close to 200 mining companies were operating in the area. But once the uncertainty of the mines potential became known, many of them left the district. Hamilton then experienced a depression and many residents left as quickly as they had come. The population shrunk to 3,915. A disastrous fire on June 27, 1873 spread throughout the business district and caused $600,000 in damage. Hamilton’s slide continued and by late 1873 had shrunk to 500. Another fire struck the town on January 5, 1885, destroying the courthouse and much of what remained in the dying town. Hamilton was dealt its worst blow when the county seat was moved to Ely in 1887. The town was revived in the early 1980s when extensive mining operations began on Treasure Hill. The town now has bout 75 residents and care has been taken not to disturb the ruins. Hamilton is well worth the trip.

Hamilton, Nevada: Great article in Desert Magazine, October, 1941, by Dale Hamilton. Five big pictures and a DM map. Page 20:
http://www.dezertmagazine.com/mine/1941DM10/index.html

Hamilton, Nevada: There is a great write-up on Hamilton in the May 1974 issue of Desert Magazine. Overnight in a ghost town , page 16, by Thomas Moore. There's six pictures, historical information that complements the write-up at GhostTowns.com, and the writing itself is so wonderfully intimate, I know you'll enjoy this one.
Big Sandy


Ruins of the Withington Hotel
Courtesy Dolores Steele


Hamilton
Courtesy Dolores Steele


Hamilton
Courtesy Dolores Steele


Hamilton
Courtesy Dolores Steele


Hamilton
Courtesy Dolores Steele


Hamilton
Courtesy Dolores Steele


Hamilton
Courtesy Dolores Steele


Hamilton
Courtesy Dolores Steele


Hamilton in 1956
Courtesy Marty Wilke


Hamilton
Courtesy Kevin Ward, The Mineral Gallery


Hamilton
Courtesy Kevin Ward, The Mineral Gallery


Hamilton
Courtesy Dolores Steele


Hamilton
Courtesy Dolores Steele


Hamilton
Courtesy Dolores Steele


Hamilton
Courtesy Dolores Steele


Hamilton
Courtesy Dolores Steele


Hamilton Stock
Courtesy Steve Bruce


Old House in Hamilton
Courtesy Jason

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