OSCEOLA

NAME: Osceola
COUNTY: White Pine
ROADS: 2WD
GRID #(See map): 6
CLIMATE: 70-80 degrees April - October
BEST TIME TO VISIT:
Spring, summer, fall
COMMENTS: Just off Highway 50, the lonliest highway in America.
REMAINS: Great Cemetery and a few structures.

Located on Mt. Wheeler in Northern Nevada, Osceola was discovered in 1872. Water was a-plenty and the camp soon grew to 250 by 1874. In 1877, a second mine nearby was discovered and people moved into the flats around Osceola. The Population soon reach 1000 residents. The abundance of water led to hydraulic mining and nuggets worth $150,000 today were taken. Soon, the mines played out and the town became a ghost. Submitted by Dave Raymond.

Be sure to get the info on the ditch, about halfway up Wheeler peak. Ditch dug, cost of millions, to provide water. Town shut down right after ditch completion. You can follow ditch to town, but need to be an experienced hiker. It's an all day hike. Submitted by Myron and Chrissie Hardgrave.

Osceola has a fascinating history and is well worth a day’s visit. The first discovery of gold lode ore was made in 1872 but it was the discovery of placer fields in 1877 that put Osceola on the map. The biggest problem was the lack of water to work the placers that hindered the development of the camp. Osceola nevertheless received national attention when the largest gold nugget ever discovered in Nevada and valued at $6,000 was found in May 1877. $250,000 was spent to construct two ditches to bring water to the district. The first hydraulic mining operation in Nevada was started and found great success. The company employed 300 men and was active until the early 1900s. Osceola’s long, gradual decline began with a fire on April 30, 1890 that destroyed most buildings on the north side of Main Street. Placer deposits slowly began to run out. This, combined with the deterioration of the water ditches, forced the Osceola Placer Mining Company to fold in 1900. Until a fire in the late 1950s destroyed all remaining buildings, Osceola always had a few residents. The fire brought and end to the longest-lived placer town in Nevada. The cemetery is the highlight of a visit to the site. Though it is sad to red the stories on the gravestones, they do reveal the interesting history of Osceola and the surrounding area.


Assay Office
Courtesy Myron and Chrissie Hardgrave


Cemetery
Courtesy Myron and Chrissie Hardgrave


Osceola
Courtesy Cat & Ripley


Osceola
Courtesy Cat & Ripley


Osceola
Courtesy Cat & Ripley

 


Osceola
Courtesy Cat & Ripley

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