TUSCARORA

NAME: Tuscarora
COUNTY: Elko
ROADS: 2WD
GRID: 2
CLIMATE: Mild Winter, hot summer.
BEST TIME TO VISIT:
Anytime.
COMMENTS: On S.R. 789.
REMAINS: A few original buildings.

Few Nevada mining towns had an abundance of water. Tuscarora had more than it could use, given the fact that few of its inhabitants used it to quench their thirst, preferring something not so colorless. Its most productive years were from 1870 to1890 when its mines produced $40,000,000 in silver. The town's population was about four thousand people, split almost equally between whites and Chinese. The Chinese came to build the railroad and stayed to operate opium dens, brothels and gambling houses. Located on Mt. Blitzen northwest of Elko on highway 11, Tuscarora was as untamed as any camp and worse than many. Submitted by Henry Chenoweth.

Tuscarora has a rather unique beginning. Unique in the sense that it took almost ten years after the first gold discoveries were made before the town began to grow. Placer deposits were discovered in July of 1867. Nothing much happened until 1869 when the first Chinese move into the area. By the end of the year more than 200 Chinese miners had arrived and formed a Chinatown adjacent to the Tuscarora camp. The Chinese became more efficient than the whites in placer mining primarily because they were willing to work harder and longer. In 1870, Tuscarora had a population of 119 of which 104 were Chinese and 15 were white. During the early 1870s, the frustrated white miners left the placer operations and began prospecting in the nearby hills. Silver was discovered and Tuscarora became a silver mining town. Mills were built to process the ore, stage lines included the town in their routes, businesses flourished, schools were built, and Tuscarora became the place to be. The two most productive years were 1878 and 1879. The population had reached 1,500. In each of those years, Tuscarora’s mines yielded more than $1 million worth of bullion. But fires that had spared the town during the first few years of its existence began to plague to town. That, together with a new discovery in the Wood River region of Idaho started a small exodus from Tuscarora. During the mid 1880s, the big mines of the 1870s began to play out and the population had slipped to less than 1,000. The town continued to suffer and many businesses closed their doors. The stage coaches were full leaving town and empty upon their return. During the ensuing years there were many attempts at revival but none succeeded in returning the town to its previous glory. Today, Tuscarora is classified as a ghost town although there are a few people still living there. Visitors are guaranteed to enjoy themselves.

Tuscarora, Nevada: Nel Murbarger wrote a piece for the January, 1950 issue of Desert Magazine, Printer of Old Tuscarora. Eight photos and a DM map, plus a lot of historical  minutiae. Starts on page 27. A good read.


Tuscarora
Courtesy Dolores Steele


Tuscarora
Courtesy Dolores Steele


Tuscarora
Courtesy Dolores Steele


Tuscarora
Courtesy Dolores Steele


Tuscarora
Courtesy Dolores Steele


Tuscarora
Courtesy Dolores Steele


Tuscaurora, NV. D.A. Wright photo.


Cemetery, Tuscaurora, NV. D.A. Wright photo.


Cemetery, Tuscaurora, NV. D.A. Wright photo.


Cemetery, Tuscaurora, NV. D.A. Wright photo.


Tuscaurora, NV. D.A. Wright photo.


Tuscaurora, NV. D.A. Wright photo.


Tuscaurora, NV. D.A. Wright photo.


Tuscarora
Courtesy Bill Yanneck


Tuscarora
Courtesy Bill Yanneck


Tuscarora
Courtesy Bill Yanneck


Tuscarora
Courtesy Dolores Steele


Tuscarora
Courtesy Dolores Steele


Tuscarora
Courtesy Dolores Steele


Tuscarora
Courtesy Dolores Steele


A sad reminder of infant mortality, which often inflicted pain on towns of old. D.A. Wright.


Tuscaurora, NV. D.A. Wright photo.


Tuscaurora, NV. D.A. Wright photo.


Tuscaurora, NV. D.A. Wright photo.


Tuscaurora, NV. D.A. Wright photo.


Tuscaurora, NV. D.A. Wright photo.


Tuscarora Brewery
Courtesy Dan Brown


Tuscarora Brewery
Courtesy Dan Brown

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